Saturday, June 26, 2010

Iams Cat Food Recall

Specific lots of canned cat food are being recalled because of insufficient amounts of vitamin B1 (also known as thiamine). This recall is similar to the Diamond Foods cat food recall in October 2009, also due to low levels of thiamine.

Iams ProActive Health canned Cat and Kitten Food - all varieties of 3 oz & 5.5 oz cansDate on Bottom of Can - 09/2011 to 06/2012


  • Proctor and Gamble (P&G), Iams parent company, is voluntarily recalling specific lots of its Iams canned cat food in North America as a precautionary measure. Diagnostic testing indicated that the product may contain insufficient levels of thiamine (Vitamin B1), which is essential for cats.
  • This recall is limited to only Iams canned cat food distributed in North America. No other Iams pet food is involved.
  • Cats that were fed these canned products as their only food are at greater risk for developing signs of thiamine deficiency.
  • Early signs of thiamine deficiency may include loss of appetite, salivation, vomiting and weight loss. In advanced cases, signs may include ventroflexion (downward curving) of the neck, wobbly gait, falling, circling and seizures.
  • Contact your veterinarian immediately if your cat is displaying any of these signs. If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible.
  • Consumers who have purchased canned cat food with these codes should discard it. For further information or a product refund call P&G toll-free at 877-340-8826 (Monday - Friday, 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM EST).

Friday, June 18, 2010

The Buzz on Bee Stings

Dogs are more likely than humans to get stung by bees because they like to play with anything that moves, including bees and their hives. But dogs are just as likely to be allergic to those stings and have bad reactions.

If your dog is stung by a Bee remove the stinger immediately in case your dog is allergic to the poison and goes into anaphylactic shock. Using a credit card, scrape out the part of the stinger you can see or pull the whole stinger out with tweezers, but only if you can reach it. Breaking it will allow more poison into your dog's blood stream.
Assess your dog's physical condition. If he or she is having problems breathing, acts weak, disoriented, or is vomiting or having diarrhea, see a veterinarian immediately. If your dog seems OK, continue to keep an eye on them for at least 24 hours.


Saturday, June 12, 2010

Fun Dog Facts

Teddy Roosevelt's pit bull, Pete, once ripped off a French ambassador's pants at a White House event.


If never spayed or neutered, a female dog, her mate, and their puppies could produce over 66,000 dogs in 6 years!

Zorba, an English Mastiff, is the heaviest dog on record, weighing 343 lbs at the age of 8 in 1989.
Franklin D. Roosebelt once spent $15,000 to have a destroyer return to the Aleutian Islands and retrieve his Scottie, Fala, who had been accidentally left behind.
According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the smallest dog on record was a Yorkshire Terrier in Great Britain who, at the age of 2, weighed just 4 ounces.

The only sweat glands a dog has are between the paw pads.

A one-year-old dog is physically as mature as a 15 year-old human.

Plato once said that “a dog has the soul of a philosopher.”

The oldest dog on record was an Australian cattle dog named Bluey who lived 29 years and 5 months. In human years, that is more than 160 years old

Saturday, June 5, 2010